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raspberry frangipane tart

14 Jan 2019



It all began with a raspberry tart from my local bakery whilst I was in Paris last year. I love raspberry tarts and every one I've sampled in Paris has always been a little different. Some are nothing more than a crisp tart shell filled with berries; some have a crème patissiere filling, whilst others have a frangipane base topped with fresh berries. This one had a frangipane base topped with a berry compote rather than jam. It was delicious and I knew it was something I'd like to create at home.




Well raspberries are plentiful at the moment and not too expensive so I set to work trying to recreate that special tart. Rather than making individual tarts I decided to make a singular larger tart.



Why I decided to make pastry on a 30°C day is beyond me. When I tried to roll out the pastry, it melted so there I was at 9.00 p.m lining the tart shell when the weather had cooled down a little. 




The beauty of a frangipane tart, is there is no need to pre-bake the tart shell. Whilst the recipe sounds like a lot of work, many of the stages can be made ahead and put together at the last moment. I made both the pastry and the Crème pâtissière ahead of time. I made the frangipane in the food processor so it took 5 minutes to make from whoa to go. The raspberry compote only takes a few minutes to prepare as well and you could always leave this step out and use  some raspberry jam.




Whilst I used my own pastry recipe and compote recipe, the filling is based on the one I found here. I was supposed to top the tart completely with fresh berries but the compote was so pretty I didn't want to hide it from view. I now have 2 extra punnets of raspberries in the fridge that I know, won't be going to waste.



Here's the recipe for you. For all my recipes I use a 250 ml cup, a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional gas oven so if your oven is fan forced you may need to reduce the oven temperature by 20°C.

Raspberry Frangipane Tart – makes a deep 17cm tart or a shallow 22cm
Pastry 
¼ cup icing sugar (confectioner’s sugar)
¼ cup almond meal
175g plain flour
Pinch salt
110 g (4 oz) cold unsalted butter, diced
1 egg yolk lightly beaten

Crème pâtissière
1/3 cup milk
1/4 of a vanilla pod or 1 tsp vanilla extract
20 g sugar
1 tsp flour
1 tsp cornflour
½ beaten egg
5 g unsalted butter

Frangipane
50g unsalted butter
50g caster sugar
½ beaten egg
50g almond meal
Pinch salt
1 tsp plain flour
1 tsp rum
1 quantity crème patissiere

Raspberry Compote
250g frozen raspberries
75g (⅓ cup) caster sugar 
1 tbs water
7g cornflour mixed with 1 tbs water
A squeeze of lemon or lime juice

Topping
1-2 punnets raspberries

Pastry
To make the pastry, combine all the dry ingredients in a food processor, and whiz for a few seconds until well combined and free of lumps. Add the cold butter and whiz until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Add the egg yolk and whiz until a soft dough just starts to form around the blade. Remove the dough from the food processor and gather the pastry into a ball; flatten slightly before wrapping in plastic and placing in the fridge. You’ll only need about half of the pastry dough to make a 17cm tart or the full quantity to make a 22 cm tart. The pastry freezes well so just wrap the remaining pastry in plastic wrap and store in the freezer. 

Refrigerate the pastry for an hour and then roll out thinly - 3mm thick. Line a greased 17 cm flan tin with the pastry then return to the fridge for another 30 minutes during which time you can make the Crème pâtissière, the frangipane and the raspberry compote. 

Crème pâtissière
In a small saucepan, bring the milk, 10g of sugar and the vanilla pod to the boil. In a separate bowl, mix half the beaten egg with the remaining sugar, flour and cornflour.

Pour the milk over the egg mix, mix well, put back into the saucepan return to the heat and keep cooking for 1 min after the mix thickens. Add the butter, mix well to combine then cool and reserve.

Frangipane
Cream together the unsalted butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the egg followed by the almond meal, salt, flour and rum. You should end up with a soft paste. Stir in the cooled crème pâtissière.

Compote
In a small saucepan, bring half the frozen raspberries, the sugar and water to a simmer. To thicken the raspberries, add the cornflour mixture to the raspberries and allow to just simmer but don’t boil as the raspberries will fall apart. Cook gently until the mixture is quite thick then pour over the remaining berries and set to one side to cool. Add a squeeze of lemon juice to taste, stir through gently then place in the fridge until needed. You’ll need ½ cup of the compote for this recipe or 1 cup if you're making the larger tart. Store any remaining compote in the fridge and spoon over your muesli or serve with yoghurt.

Tart
Preheat the oven to 190°C. Fill the pastry shell with the frangipane mixture then level the surface with a knife. You only want the filling to come about halfway up the pastry shell. Place the tart on an oven tray in the preheated oven and bake at 190°C/375°F for 40 minutes until the frangipane filling has puffed and is golden brown. Remove from the oven, place on a rack and let the tart cool completely.



To assemble the tart - spoon the raspberry compote over the baked almond filling. You’ll need a full cup of the compote and more fresh raspberries to make the 22 cm tart. Place each raspberry around the edge of the tart facing down as close as possible to the next raspberry to create a nice circular pattern. Place in the fridge until serving time.

I'm yet to have a slice but I'll report back when I have. (I had my slice last night and it was delicious!)

See you all again next week with some more baking from my kitchen.

Bye for now,

Jillian

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PUMPKIN HONEY NUT ROLL

7 Jan 2019



Happy New Year and welcome to the first post for 2019. When I was back in Brisbane for Christmas I discovered an old but never used nut loaf tin in the cupboard under the oven. It needed a good clean so once that was done I came back to Sydney with the tin in my luggage, inspired to make a nut roll.



There are quite a few recipes for the classic date and nut roll on the internet but I wanted to make something a little different. I looked through my copy of Sweet by Ottolenghi and Helen Goh and decided to make the butternut, honey and almond tin cake. I thought I had all the ingredients on hand but when I checked I'd run out of almonds so I used toasted pecans instead.



I'd never baked a cake in a roll tin before so I closely followed the instructions I found online, which cautioned over filling the tin. I probably could have filled the tin a little more because I had enough batter leftover to make a little bundt cake. If you don't have a nut roll tin, Ottolenghi suggests using two 400g tin cans with one end removed. The tins need to be lined with baking paper, with an overhang to help remove the cake from the tin once baked.




Here's the recipe for the pumpkin honey nut roll which was adapted from an Ottolenghi recipe from Sweet. This should make 1 large roll, 1 loaf or 2 small cakes baked in 400g tin cans. For all my recipes I use a 250 ml cup, a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional gas oven so if your oven is fan forced you may need to reduce the oven temperature by 20°C.



Pumpkin Honey Nut Roll
Ingredients
100g cold cooked mashed pumpkin (I oven roasted mine but you could steam it or microwave it)
125g unsalted butter, softened
100g caster sugar
1 tsp grated orange rind
25g runny honey
1 large egg, beaten
160g self-raising flour, sifted with a pinch of salt
¼ cup milk
100g raisins, soaked in hot water for 10 minutes then drained
50g coarsely chopped toasted pecans

Method
Preheat oven to 190°C. Adjust the oven racks to give you enough space to place the tin upright in the oven. Grease and flour an 8cm x 17cm nut roll tin. Line the 2 ends of the roll tin with baking paper and secure one to make the base of the tin. If you can’t locate a nut roll tin then you can use two 400g tin cans, with the top removed, carefully lined with baking paper. Allow an overhang if using this method to help you wrangle the cake out of the tin. Otherwise use a small loaf tin or a 17cm round tin greased and lined with baking paper.

Cream together the butter, sugar, grated orange rind and the honey until the mixture is light and fluffy. Add the egg gradually and beat until combined. Mix in the cooked pumpkin, followed by the flour, alternating with the milk, then stir in the raisins and the pecans. The mixture should be quite soft. Spoon the mixture into the prepared tin. If using a nut roll tin you should fill the tin just over halfway. Place the second lid on top of the roll tin. If you’re using a loaf tin, cover the top of the tin with a layer of pleated foil to allow the cake to steam while cooking, giving it its characteristic texture. I had a bit of mixture leftover so I greased and filled a small bundt tin.

Place the tin(s) on a baking tray and bake for 25-30 minutes for the bundt and 45-50 minutes for the roll or until a long skewer or piece of spaghetti inserted comes out clean. You’ll need to use an oven mitt to carefully remove the top lid to do this. 

The baked cake is very moist so allow it to cool and firm for about 30 minutes before unhooking the side of the tin and placing it on a cooling rack or sliding the roll out using the baking paper. Once cold, I wrapped the cake in plastic and stored it overnight in the fridge before serving.



The cake is lovely thickly sliced and topped with butter. I found it quite sweet because of the pumpkin, so next time I’d reduce the sugar to 75g.

See you all again next week with some more baking from my kitchen.

Bye for now,

Jillian 

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seasons greetings

24 Dec 2018




It's been a long and tiring year so I'll be taking a short break from blogging and hope to see you all again January 7, 2019.

Wishing you all the best for the festive season. By the way, if you'd like the recipe for this fruit mince star bread it can be found here.

Bye for now,

Jillian


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xmas 2018 - mangomisu

21 Dec 2018



Welcome to Day 5, the last day of Christmas Week. I've had this recipe for Mangomisu bookmarked for ever.



W
hen mangoes and passionfruit started to appear in the fruit shop, I decided it was high time I made a mangomisu for this year's Christmas week. I went to the grocery store and came back with a huge package of savoiardi, enough to make 2 mangomisus, a container of mascarpone and some cream and I was good to go. As there is no cooking involved, it's hard to describe making this as baking, so we'll call it an assemblage.




I tweaked the recipe a bit based on some of the comments and the need to make it alcohol free for my work place. Although there's no baking involved, this isn't something you can throw together at the last minutes as the mangomisu needs to set for at least 2 hours before serving.

Here's the recipe for you. For all my recipes I use a 250ml cup and a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs.

Mangomisu
Ingredients
1 egg yolk
35g pure icing sugar, sifted
300ml thickened cream
250g good-quality mascarpone cheese
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 small mangoes, flesh sliced ½ cm thick
Juice of 2 oranges – 150mls
¼ cup passionfruit pulp
18 small savoiardi (sponge finger biscuits)

To decorate
1 passionfruit
1 punnet raspberries

Method
Line the base of a loaf pan (23cm x 10cm) with plastic wrap, foil or baking paper, leaving 2 cm overhanging.

Place the egg yolk and icing sugar, thickened cream, mascarpone and vanilla extract in a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment and whisk on high speed until stiff and well combined. Chill until needed.

Combine the orange juice and passionfruit pulp in the bowl of a food processor and whiz for a few seconds to separate the pulp from the seeds. Pour the juice through a fine sieve in a separate bowl. 

Dip a third of the sponge fingers into the juice mixture and layer in the base of the prepared pan. Spread with one-third of the mascarpone mixture, and top with one-third of the mango slices. Repeat the process, then top with the remaining mascarpone mixture, reserving the remaining mango slices to serve. Cover the cake and chill for 2 hours or overnight until firm.





To serve, carefully remove the mangomisu from cake pan and transfer the mangomisu to a platter. (I just trimmed the foil around the mangomisu once it was safely on the platter). Decorate with curls of the reserved mango and a few fresh raspberries then serve topped with passionfruit pulp.



Stand back and watch this disappear. This was an absolute hit at work and as I still have loads of sponge fingers spare, I have plans to make a berrymisu version in the New Year.

See you all again on Monday for my final post of the year.

Bye for now,

Jillian

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xmas 2018 - rhubarb and ricotta tart

20 Dec 2018



Welcome to Day 4 of Christmas Week 2018. Originally I'd planned to make a raspberry frangipane tart for this year's Christmas Week inspired by one I tried in Paris. Whilst looking through my copy of Flour and Stone I saw a photograph of a rhubarb and ricotta tart and soon changed my mind. I have a love for rhubarb and these days it's always available at my local fruit shop so inspired by the image, I decided to work on my own version. 



I used my almond shortcrust pastry for the base and the filling is an adaptation of the filling from the lemon ricotta tart. The oven baked rhubarb is another tried and true recipe. The quantity needed to top the tart is quite small so store the leftovers in the fridge and use it to top your muesli or as a dessert.



Here's the recipe for you. For all my recipes I use a 250 ml cup, a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional gas oven so if your oven is fan forced you may need to reduce the oven temperature by 20°C.



Rhubarb and Ricotta Tart – makes an oblong 10 x 30cm tart

Oven Roasted Rhubarb 
1 bunch rhubarb, stalks washed and trimmed
4 tablespoons caster sugar
The juice of half an orange
2 strips of orange rind, each strip ~ 5cm long
1 cinnamon stick

Pastry 
¼ cup icing sugar (confectioner’s sugar)
¼ cup almond meal
1⅓ cups plain flour
110 g (4 oz) cold unsalted butter, diced
1 egg, lightly beaten
Cold water

Filling
150g fresh ricotta cheese
100g cream cheese at room temperature
50g mascarpone
⅓ cup caster sugar plus 1 additional tbs
2 eggs, separated
2 tsp grated orange rind 

To serve
250 mls thickened cream whipped to soft peaks

Oven roasted rhubarb
Preheat the oven to 200°C. Cut the rhubarb stalks into 10cm lengths and place into a baking dish with the orange rind and the cinnamon stick. Sprinkle with the sugar and drizzle the rhubarb with the orange juice. Cover the dish with foil or a lid and bake for 10-15 minutes or until the rhubarb is cooked but still holds its shape. Remove the dish from the oven and allow the rhubarb to cool. When cool, remove the cinnamon stick (it can be washed and used again) and store the rhubarb in a sealed container in the fridge. You won’t need all the rhubarb for this recipe

Pastry
To make the pastry, combine all the dry ingredients in a food processor, and whiz for a few seconds until well combined and free of lumps. Add the cold butter and whiz until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Add the egg and sufficient cold water and whiz until a soft dough just starts to form around the blade. Remove the dough from the food processor and gather the pastry into a ball; flatten slightly before wrapping in plastic and placing in the fridge. Refrigerate the pastry for 30 minutes. You’ll only need about half of the pastry dough for this recipe. The pastry freezes well so just wrap the remaining pastry in plastic wrap and store in the freezer.

Grease a 10 x 30cm flan tin and place it on an oven tray. Line the tin with pastry, trim the edges then refrigerate for a further 30 minutes. Meanwhile preheat oven to 190°C. Cover the pastry with a sheet of baking paper and fill the shell with baking beads or rice and blind bake for 10-15 minutes. Carefully remove the paper and beans from the pastry case and return to the oven for a further 10 minutes or until golden brown and the base is dry. If any cracks occur in the pastry, you can patch the holes with some leftover pastry.

Make the filling while the pastry is baking. Place the cheeses in the food processor and process until smooth. Add ⅓ cup caster sugar, the egg yolks and the orange rind and process again. In a clean dry bowl beat the egg whites until stiff. Add the extra tablespoon of sugar and beat until glossy. Pour the cheese mixture over the egg whites and gently fold together. Reduce the oven temperature to 170°C. Put the flan tin into the oven then carefully pour in the ricotta filling – you’ll have a little filling left over. Bake for about 30 minutes or until the filling has puffed and is just set. The tart should still have a wobble in the centre when you jiggle the tin. It will continue to cook and firm up when it is out of the oven and cooling. 

Allow to cool completely before decorating the top of the tart with the whipped cream and the rhubarb slices.



I know there are lots of steps in this recipe, but both the pastry and oven roasted rhubarb can be made in advance and the filling takes no time at all to prepare. I think it's worth the effort. When I took this into work,it was an absolute hit with my work mates. 

See you all tomorrow with the last of my Christmas Week bakes.

Bye for now,

Jillian

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xmas 2018 - chocolate orange tart

19 Dec 2018



Welcome to Day 3 of Christmas Week. I was looking through Sweet by Ottolenghi and Helen Goh and saw a photo of some little baked chocolate tarts. The tarts have a sweet surprise of either marmalade or tahini in the base. I'm not a huge tahini fan but I knew I had a pot of blood orange marmalade lurking in one of my cupboards. I located the pot of marmalade then put my thinking cap on and wondered if I could make a larger chocolate tart using the 17cm tart ring I'd carefully carried home from Paris.  



I used my favourite chocolate pastry recipe for the shell, then spooned some marmalade into the pre-cooked base. I then topped the marmalade with my favourite chocolate custard filling before baking the filling until it had just set. As I'd not made the tart before, I took it into work with my fingers crossed. I shouldn't have worried because the tart was a triumph - crisp chocolate pastry, silky smooth filling with a marmalade surprise in the base. I was going to candy some orange slices for decoration but instead bought a bag of chocolate dipped orange slices online. 



Here's the recipe for you which makes a 3 cm deep 17cm tart. For all my recipes I use a 250 ml cup, a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional gas oven so if your oven is fan forced you may need to reduce the oven temperature by 20°C.




Chocolate Orange Tart Recipe - makes a 17cm tart
Chocolate Pastry
225 g (8 oz) plain flour
25 gm (¼ cup) cocoa 
125 g (4½ oz) unsalted butter chilled and cubed 
85 g (3 oz) caster sugar
1 egg, beaten

Filling
225g good-quality dark chocolate, roughly chopped
2 eggs
150ml thickened cream, plus extra whipped cream to serve (optional)
100ml milk
½ cup orange marmalade

Topping
Cocoa powder
Chocolate orange slices (optional)
Whipped cream

Pastry
Place the flour, cocoa, butter and sugar in a food processor and process until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Gradually add the beaten egg until the dough starts to gather around the blade of the processor. Remove the dough and bring together into a ball. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 30 minutes. You won’t need all the pastry so freeze the leftovers for later use. 

Method
Lightly grease a 17 x 3 cm tart pan. Roll pastry between 2 sheets of baking paper to 5mm thick, then use to line pan. Chill for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 180°C. Line the pastry with baking paper and pastry weights or uncooked rice. Blind-bake for 20 minutes, then remove paper and weights and bake for 10 minutes or until pastry is dry. Set to one side until cool. If there are any cracks in the pastry, repair the cracks with some of the leftover dough.

Reduce oven to 150°C. Place chocolate in a heatproof bowl over a pan of gently simmering water, not letting bowl touch water. Allow to melt and then stir until smooth. Remove from heat and cool. Gently whisk eggs in a separate bowl to just combine (don't allow to froth).

Heat cream and milk in a saucepan over medium heat until just below boiling point and then pour over eggs, stirring. Return to pan over low heat and stir for about 5 minutes until thick. Pour the custard through a sieve over bowl of chocolate, stirring gently until smooth.



Spread the marmalade over the base of the cooled pastry shell. Pour over the chocolate custard, then bake for 10-15 minutes or until just set. Leave tart in switched-off oven for 1 hour with the door closed. Remove and cool completely before slicing. If desired, top with a dusting of cocoa powder and a chocolate dipped orange slice with some whipped cream on the side.




It was a bit of a fiddle making the tart but I think the end result was worth the effort.

See you all again tomorrow for Day 4 of Christmas Week.

By for now,

Jillian

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