SLIDER

blueberry lemon scrolls

3 Jul 2022

 

I have a love/hate relationship with Instagram. I came late to the Instagram party and whilst it doesn't seem to benefit me or my blog in any measurable way, it does introduce me to new people and new recipes.
 
 
Last week I saw a photo of a blueberry cinnamon roll on Instagram and instantly knew I needed such a thing in my life. I have a killer cinnamon roll recipe thanks to Sarah Kieffer and a good cream cheese icing recipe; I just needed to find a blueberry filling. Blueberry jam would have been perfect but it wasn't available in the supermarket and I didn't want a gloopy starch thickened filling so I went on the hunt for a blueberry filling made with blueberries, sugar and lemon.


Once I found a filling recipe I went into action. The filling was quite liquid and I was a bit concerned
I would lose all the filling during the rolling process so at the last minute I brushed the dough with melted butter (because why ever not?) and sprinkled the butter with some almond meal to thicken the filling a little. I then refrigerated the roll for an hour or so before cutting it into pieces and it seemed to do the trick.

 
 
Here's my recipe for blueberry lemon scrolls which makes 8-10 scrolls depending on how large you like your scrolls. For all my recipes I use a 250ml cup, a 20ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional oven so if you have a fan-forced oven you may need to reduce the temperature by 20°C. 
 

 

 

Blueberry lemon scrolls - inspired by Broma Bakery; scroll recipe adapted from Sarah Kieffer and the filling came from Bread by Elise.
Dough

2 eggs at room temperature

90 mls milk, lukewarm

30 mls honey

1 tsp vanilla extract

2 cups (300g) plain flour 

1 tsp yeast

½ tsp salt

75g room temperature unsalted butter, cut into small pieces 


Blueberry lemon filling  

200g fresh or frozen blueberries

100g sugar

2 tsp lemon juice 

1 tsp lemon rind

30g unsalted butter, melted and cooled 

1 tbs almond meal

Pinch salt


Lemon cream cheese icing

30g unsalted butter, room temperature 

60g cream cheese, room temperature 

1/2 tsp vanilla bean paste

Pinch salt

1 tsp lemon rind

1 cup icing sugar, sifted 

 

Method

Grease a large bowl. Combine the eggs, milk, honey and vanilla in a large measuring cup.

 

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle, mix the flour, yeast, and salt and stir on low to combine. Add the egg mixture and mix on low to combine. With the mixer on low, add the butter, one piece at a time. When all the butter has been added, increase the speed to medium and beat the butter into the dough, until all the little butter pieces are incorporated, 1 minute. Transfer the dough to the prepared bowl. The dough will be very sticky and you will need a spatula to scrape the dough into the bowl.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rise for 30 minutes. Place your fingers or a spatula underneath the dough and gently pull the dough up and fold it back over itself. Turn the bowl and repeat this folding again. Continue 6 to 8 more times, until all the dough has been folded over on itself. Re-cover the bowl with plastic and let rise for 30 minutes. Repeat this series of folding 3 more times, for a rise time of 2 hours and a total of 4 foldings. Tightly cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight or up to 72 hours

Blueberry Lemon Filling

Place the blueberries, sugar, lemon juice and rind into a small saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil while constantly stirring. Taste to see if it's sweet enough for your liking and add more sugar if desired. Once the mixture has come to a boil, reduce the heat to med-low, and let it simmer for 10-20 minutes until it is very thick and jam-like. Transfer the filling to a bowl, cover, and let it cool to room temperature before placing it in the fridge.

 

Shape the dough

Flour a work surface and knead the dough 10 to 12 times to activate the gluten. Shape the dough into a ball, cover the top lightly with flour, and cover with a tea towel and let come to room temperature. 

 

 
Grease and line a 26cm pan with baking paper and set to one side. On a well-floured surface roll the dough out into a long rectangle about 16 x 12 inches. Brush the dough with the melted butter, sprinkle over the almond meal and the salt, and then spread the blueberry filling all the way to the edge of the dough, using an offset spatula or the back of a spoon to spread it evenly. From the long end, roll the dough away from you into a tight roll, sealing the bottom edge down by pinching the dough together. Refrigerate the roll for an hour to firm up the dough and the filling.
 
 
Remove the dough from the fridge and use scissors or a sharp knife to cut the dough into 8-10 equal pieces. Transfer the pieces to the prepared pan and place them cut side up. I tucked the loose ends of the roll underneath. Cover the pan loosely with plastic wrap and let the dough rise until doubled, 1 to 1 and 1/2 hours. 

 

Preheat the oven to 180°C, conventional. Remove the plastic and bake the rolls for 25-30 minutes on the centre rack or until the rolls are golden brown, rotating the pan halfway through. While the rolls are baking, prepare the icing. 

 

Icing

Place the butter, cream cheese, vanilla, salt and lemon rind into a medium size bowl. Using a hand beater, mix on medium until smooth and creamy. Add the icing sugar and mix on low until combined. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and mix on medium until the icing is light and fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes. 

 

When the rolls are ready, transfer the pan to a wire rack and let cool for 5 minutes. Using an offset spatula or table knife, apply a thin layer of the cream cheese icing, using about one-third of the mixture. Let the rolls cool for another 15 to 20 minutes then top with the rest of the icing and serve. 

 



If you’d like to make overnight rolls then prepare the rolls (roll out dough, fill them, roll them up, cut them, and put them in the prepared pan,) then cover them loosely with plastic and refrigerate for up to 18 hours. 

 

When ready to bake, preheat the oven, and let the rolls sit at room temperature (still covered in plastic) until puffy. Bake as directed (they might take slightly longer to bake).

 



I had one of the rolls for my breakfast and it was fluffy, filled to the brim with blueberries and so tasty. I shared the goodies with my neighbours but I do have 2 scrolls tucked away in the freezer for a rainy day.
 
See you all again next week with some more baking from my kitchen. 
 
Bye for now, 
 
Jillian
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flour bakery cranberry maple pecan cake

27 Jun 2022


I've had this recipe bookmarked since last year's lockdown, an oldie but a goodie from Joanne Chang of Flour Bakery. As the cake contains cranberries, pecans and maple syrup it would make the perfect Thanksgiving cake. 


Even though the original recipe made a loaf cake, I really wanted to make it in a bundt tin because bundt cakes are so pretty. 

Here are all the reasons why you shouldn't bake this cake in a bundt tin. There is maple syrup in the batter and despite how well greased and floured the tin is, as the maple syrup cooks it welds the cake to the tin. 

Secondly, the bundt tin I used is probably closer to a 4 cup tin than a 5 cup tin and the batter overflowed during baking, something I didn't realise until I took the cake out of the oven. The excess batter overflowed into the central hole, once again welding the cake firmly to the tin. 

It took 30 minutes of cooling time with the cake upside down and loads of encouragement from an offset spatula before the cake finally released. You may notice the exterior of cake isn't pristine but I was just grateful the cake came out in 1 piece and not 6 pieces. So please, don't bake this cake in a bundt tin, go the easy route and bake it in a baking paper lined loaf pan. It will be so much easier to unmould.

 

Here's the recipe for you, which will make a 9 x 5 inch loaf or a 5 cup bundt cake. For all my recipes I use a 250 ml cup, a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional oven so if you have a fan-forced oven you may need to reduce the temperature by 20°C. I've made this cake twice now and have made quite a few changes to the original recipe, the link to which can be found below.

Cranberry Maple Pecan Cake -  adapted from Flour’ by Joanne Chang.
Cake
50 gm toasted pecans, coarsely chopped
1 cup (150g) plain flour
1 tbs (10g) cornflour
1 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp bicarb soda
pinch salt
⅔ cup (145g) caster sugar
100g unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into 6 pieces
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
80 mls maple syrup
100 grams fresh or frozen cranberries (not thawed), coarsely chopped

Icing
½ cup (75g) icing sugar, sifted
1 tsp melted unsalted butter
½ tsp maple extract
1-2 tbs boiling water or milk
pinch of salt

To decorate
2 tbs coarsely chopped toasted pecans
2 tbs chopped dried sweetened cranberries

Method
Centre the rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat the oven to 180°C, conventional. Grease and line a small 9 x 5 inch loaf pan with baking paper or grease and flour a 5 cup bundt tin. Set aside.

Cake
Sift the flour, cornflour, baking powder, bicarb soda and salt into the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment attached or you can use a handheld mixer. Add the sugar and cubed butter and mix together on medium speed for 3-4 minutes or until the butter is completely mixed in. It should look like coarse meal. If you are using a handheld mixer, you may need to add on a few more minutes.

Place the eggs, vanilla and maple syrup into a jug and whisk together. Add half of the mixture to the butter/flour mixture and beat on medium-high speed for about 1 minute, or until the mixture is pale, light and fluffy. Scrape down the bottom and sides of the bowl as needed with a rubber spatula to make sure all of the ingredients are evenly incorporated. On low speed, add the remaining egg mixture and beat for about 30 seconds. Scrape down the bowl again, turn the mixer to medium speed and mix for another 30 seconds. If the batter is looking too thick then add a tablespoon or so of milk, yoghurt or buttermilk. Use the spatula to fold in the cranberries and pecans then scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top.

If baking a loaf cake, bake for 60-70 minutes or until the cake is golden and springs back when your press it in the middle with your finger. If the cake is browning too quickly cover with foil or baking paper. You can also use a cake tester and insert it into the centre to see if it comes out clean. A bundt cake will take 40-50 minutes to bake. 

Transfer the cake to a wire rack and let cool for at 30 minutes before unmoulding and removing the baking paper. If making the cake in a bundt tin, cool for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack. Allow the cake to completely cool before icing.
 
 
 
Icing 
Once the cake has cooled, make the icing. Place the icing sugar in a small bowl. Add the melted butter, the maple extract and sufficient boiling water to make a thick but pourable glaze. Add a pinch of salt to counterbalance all the sweetness. If you don't have any maple extract, then just use maple syrup to make the icing. You won't need to use any water or milk.  
 

 
 
Place a tray underneath the cake or a piece of baking paper to catch the drips. Spoon the icing over the cake, letting it run down the sides. If you like, you can decorate the top of the cake with some chopped toasted pecans and cranberry pieces. Let the icing set for about 10 minutes before doing so. 
 


 
 
Allow the icing to completely set before cutting into thin slices. The cake will keep for a few days at room temperature, well-wrapped in plastic wrap.
 

 

This is a nice light cake with a subtle maple flavour. The cranberries give that little pop of freshness and it was a big hit at work.

See you all again next week with some more baking from my kitchen.

Bye for now,

Jillian

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berries and cream cake

19 Jun 2022


Last week I saw a photo of a very pretty berry laden cake on Instagram.
The cake was an almond butter cake loaded with blackberries and raspberries, topped with cream and more berries. I tracked down the recipe for the cake on the Sainsbury's Magazine website and I decided to make my own version. 

I used my butter cake recipe which uses almond meal in the batter; studded the batter with mixed berries then topped the cake with whipped cream and a berry sauce inspired by the Sainsbury's recipe.


It's winter here in Sydney when berries are usually plentiful but not so this year. Berries are really expensive so I used frozen berries in the cake then spent a small fortune on a punnet of raspberries for decoration.

Here’s the recipe for you which makes a 17cm cake. For all my recipes I use a 250ml cup and a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional gas oven so if your oven is fan forced you may need to reduce the oven temperature by 20°C.


 

Berries and cream cake inspired by a recipe from the Sainsbury's Magazine - makes a 17cm cake

Ingredients
150g fresh or frozen mixed berries

114g (4 oz) soft unsalted butter, plus extra to grease 
135g (scant 2/3 cup) caster sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp grated lemon rind
2 eggs at room temperature
115g (¾ cup) self-raising flour
½ tsp baking powder
Pinch salt
25g (¼ cup) almond meal
1/4 cup milk
 
Berry sauce
75g fresh or frozen mixed berries
1 tbsp icing sugar
30 mls lemon juice
2 tsp water
 
To serve
150ml cream
1 tbsp icing sugar
Few berries to serve, optional

Method
Preheat the oven to 180°C, conventional. Grease the base and sides of a 17 cm cake tin, then line the base with baking paper.

Cream the butter, sugar, vanilla and lemon rind until very pale. Beat in the eggs, one at a time until well combined. Sift the flour, baking powder salt into a small bowl, and then stir through the almond meal. Mix the dry ingredients into the batter alternating with the milk until well combined. 

Spread half of the cake mixture into the lined tin, scatter over half of the frozen berries and top with the rest of the cake mixture, roughly levelling the top. Scatter over the rest of the frozen berries, pressing them in slightly. 

Bake for 50 minutes until golden brown, or until a skewer inserted into the cake comes out clean. Leave to cool in the tin for 30 minutes before unmoulding then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. 


Berry sauce 
Put the reserved berries in a pan with the icing sugar, lemon juice and water. Cook gently for 5 -10 minutes until the berries have broken down. Blend to a purée, then sieve into a bowl and cool. Check the sauce for sweetness and add extra sugar if the sauce is very tart. 
 

 
 
To serve
Whip the cream and icing sugar until it holds its shape. Fold some of the berry sauce gently through the cream to create a ripple effect and then pile onto the centre of the cake. Drizzle with more sauce and top with a few extra berries if desired. Any extra sauce can be served on the side.
 
 
 
Berries and cream. What's not to love?
 
See you all again next week with some more baking from my kitchen.

Bye for now,

Jillian

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upside down miso caramel apple cake

13 Jun 2022


Do you remember Poh in an episode of Master Chef willing her upside down miso caramel apple cake to cook in time? I've been thinking about that cake ever since and with miso in the fridge and apples in the fruit bowl, the time had come to create my own version.




First I needed to find a miso caramel recipe, which I found here then I topped the apple slices with my standard butter cake recipe using some almond meal as well as flour. Once baked, let the cake cool for 15 minutes or so before inverting, otherwise the still warm cake might crack.
 

Here's the recipe for you which makes a 17cm square or round cake. 
For all my recipes I use a 250ml cup and a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional gas oven so if your oven is fan forced you may need to reduce the oven temperature by 20°C.




Upside down miso caramel apple cake
Caramel
135g (2/3 cup) caster sugar
1 tbs white miso paste
2 small red apples (250g), cored

Cake
125g (4
½ oz) unsalted butter
110g (½ cup) caster sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 eggs
¾ cup (115g) self-raising flour
½ tsp baking powder
Pinch salt
¼ cup (25g) almond meal

Method
Preheat oven to 180°C, conventional. Grease,
flour and line the base of a deep 17cm x 17cm cake pan with baking paper.

Cut 1 and 1/2 apples crosswise into thin slices, reserving the remaining apple. To make the caramel, place the sugar and 2 tbs (40ml) water in a heavy-based saucepan; stir over low heat, without boiling, until sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil, without stirring. Boil over medium heat, without stirring, for 6 minutes or until light golden-caramel in colour.

Combine the miso paste and 3 tsp water in a small bowl and mix until smooth; stir into the caramel which will spit and bubble so take care. Stir until smooth - you may need to add a little more boiling water at this stage to achieve this. Pour the miso caramel evenly over base of cake pan. Arrange the reserved apple slices in rows on the caramel in the pan. Set to one side.
 
Grate the remaining apple which should yield ¼ cup. Cream the butter, sugar and vanilla together in a bowl until light and fluffy. Add the eggs and mix until combined well. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together and stir through the almond meal. Add the flour mixture to make a soft batter, then stir through the grated apple. 

Carefully spoon the batter over the apple taking care not to disturb the slices then smooth the surface. Place the cake pan on an oven tray then bake for
35-40 minutes at 180°C, conventional or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Cover loosely with foil if cake starts over browning during baking. 
 

 

Leave cake in the pan for 15 minutes. Run a butter knife or metal spatula around the cake before turning it out onto a plate, making sure you scrape up all the reserved caramel. You may need to loosen the caramel with a little boiling water then gently brush over the apples. Serve warm or at room temperature with a dollop of cream, labne or creme fraiche.
 

 



I shared the cake with my neighbours and the cake received glowing reviews. That miso caramel is something a bit special, that's for sure.

See you all again next week with some more baking from my kitchen. 

Bye for now, 

Jillian

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coconut layer cake

6 Jun 2022


I was given a copy of Ottolenghi Test Kitchen - Shelf Love for Christmas last year. Until now I'd only made savoury items from the book, all of which have been delicious, but I thought the time had come to make something sweet.



I looked through the book and decided to make the Coconut Dream Cake but made a few changes. I really dislike the flavour of cardamom in sweet goods and cardamom features heavily in the recipe so I left it out swapping it for vanilla.



I also reduced the quantity of coconut milk in the cake batter otherwise the batter would have turned into soup. The cake also needed a touch more bicarbonate of soda than suggested as it barely rose in the centre. In the end I used my own cream cheese icing recipe because I really like it.



The coconut topping was delicious and I had to hide it away to stop me eating it all before I could decorate the cake.


Here's the recipe for you which makes a double layer 17cm cake. For all my recipes I use a 250ml cup and a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional gas oven so if your oven is fan forced you may need to reduce the oven temperature by 20°C. 


Coconut layer cake – makes a 17cm cake, inspired by an Ottolenghi recipe from Ottolenghi Test Kitchen - Shelf Love

Cake
215g (1 and 1/2 cups) self-raising flour
1/2 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda
pinch salt
200g (scant 1 cup) caster sugar
114g (4 oz) unsalted butter at room temperature, then cut into 3 cm cubes
100g (3) egg whites at room temperature
80g (1/3 cup) Greek yoghurt at room temperature
2 tsp vanilla bean paste
125 ml (1/2 cup) full fat coconut milk

Icing
75g unsalted butter at room temperature, then cut into 3 cm cubes
75g full fat cream cheese
Pinch salt
½ tsp vanilla bean paste
125g (3/4 cup) icing sugar, sifted

Coconut topping
70 g coconut flakes
1 tbs maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Method
Preheat the oven to 180⁰C conventional. Grease and line the base of 2 x 17 cm round springform cake tins with baking paper. You can bake the 2 cakes one at a time if you only have one round tin.

Place the flour, bicarbonate of soda and salt into a large bowl and whisk together to combine.

Place the caster sugar and softened butter into the bowl of a stand mixer. Using the paddle attachment, beat on a medium-high speed until light and fluffy - approximately 4 minutes. Scrape down the sides with a spatula. Lower the speed to medium and add the egg whites. Mix until just incorporated, and then add the yoghurt and vanilla bean paste. Beat for 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides again with a spatula. Add one-third of the flour mixture and one-third of the coconut milk. Alternate these until combined, and the mixture is smooth.

Transfer half of the mixture (about 385g) into one tin and the other half of the mix in the other prepared tin. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until a cake skewer comes out clean. If you only have one round tin, allow the first cake to cool slightly after cooking and release it carefully from the cake tin. Line the tin again and now bake the other cake for 35 minutes. Allow both cakes to cool completely.

Coconut topping
Place the coconut flakes, maple syrup and salt on a baking tray lined with baking paper. Toss to combine. Bake for 8 minutes at 180⁰C conventional. Stir everything again & bake for a further 5 minutes or until golden and crispy. Set aside to cool and it will crisp up further.

Icing
Place the butter, cream cheese, salt and vanilla paste in the bowl of a stand mixer. Using the paddle attachment, beat on medium-high heat until light and creamy. Add the icing sugar and mix on medium-low speed until combined. If the icing is looking a bit soft, refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Assembly
Spread a little less than half of the icing on the top of one of the cakes. Gently place the other cake on top. Spread the remaining icing on the top of the cakes using an offset spatula to help you. If it looks a little messy, it is no problem, and it is all part of the charm. Top with the coconut topping, leaving the sides exposed.


Notes
You can make the coconut topping up to three days ahead. Store in an airtight container.

You can make the coconut icing up to three days ahead. Store in a container or bowl, well covered, in the fridge. Allow it to soften outside of the fridge before icing the cake.

You can make the cakes a day ahead. Wrap well to store then assemble and ice on the day. Store the iced cake in the refrigerator but don't top the cake with the coconut topping until just before serving.


I shared the cake with my neighbours and workmates and it was declared 'delicious' by one and all. 

See you all again next week with some more baking from my kitchen.

Bye for now,

Jillian








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lemon elderflower drizzle cake

29 May 2022


A few years ago influenced by Harry and Meghan's lemon and elderflower wedding cake, I bought a bottle of elderflower cordial. 
The only trouble was I wasn't sure how to use it so the bottle stayed unopened until now. I did a hunt online and found a few cake recipes which paired elderflower with lemon so I decided to make a lemon and elderflower drizzle cake.

added a few spoons of elderflower cordial to my favourite lemon cake recipe; drizzled the cake with a lemon syrup after baking then topped the cake with a lemon and elderflower flavoured icing. To make it look a little more festive I candied some lemon rind and toped the cake with a few strands.



Here’s the recipe for you which makes a small loaf or a 17cm cake. For all my recipes I use a 250ml cup and a 20 ml tablespoon, unsalted butter and 60g eggs. My oven is a conventional gas oven so if your oven is fan forced you may need to reduce the oven temperature by 20°C.




Lemon Elderflower Drizzle Cake
Candied lemon rind (optional but you’ll need to make the candied rind the day before baking the cake to allow the rind time to set).
Ingredients
1 lemon, washed
30g caster sugar (1 and 1/2 tbs)
30 mls water 
(1 and 1/2 tbs)

Cake
125g unsalted butter, softened
100g caster sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 lemon, zested and juiced 
2 large eggs
100g self-raising flour
Pinch of salt 
½ tsp baking powder
50g almond meal 
30mls elderflower cordial

Syrup
1 tbs caster sugar
30mls lemon juice

Icing 
1 tsp melted butter
½ cup (75g) sifted icing sugar
1-2 tsp each lemon juice and elderflower cordial

Candied Lemon Rind
Remove the zest from the lemon in wide strips, making sure there is none of the bitter white pith attached. Slice into very fine strips then drop the strips into a saucepan of boiling water and leave them for 30 seconds before draining in a sieve.

Place sugar and water into a small saucepan. Heat over high heat, stirring all the while until the sugar has dissolved. As soon as it has, stop stirring and bring the mixture to the boil. Tip in the drained lemon strips and reduce the heat to low so the syrup bubbles gently. Cook the zest strips for 10 minutes, then remove the saucepan from the heat and leave the strips to cool in the syrup. Once cool, drain the strips through the sieve again. 

When the zest is well drained, tip some caster sugar onto a plate and toss the strips of zest so they’re coated in the sugar. Lay them onto a sheet of baking paper to set - they don't become brittle but remain pliable. Use them as you need them and store any leftover strips in a small airtight container at room temperature for up to a week.

Cake
Preheat the oven at 180°C, conventional. Grease, flour and line 
the base of a 17cm round tin with baking paper or grease and line a small loaf tin with a sling of baking paper.

To make the cake, combine the butter, vanilla, lemon rind and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer and beat until pale and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well between each addition. Now sift together the flour, salt and baking powder into a small bowl then stir in the almond meal. Fold through the batter alternating with the cordial (don’t worry if the mixture looks like it’s curdling a little). If the batter is looking a little dry you can add a little lemon juice or reserved lemon syrup from candying the rind to the mixture.

Spoon the cake mixture into the prepared tin. Bake for about 45 minutes until risen and golden. Insert a metal skewer into the cake to see if it is ready. If it comes out clean, the cake is done; if it has mixture sticking to it, then it needs a few minutes longer. Remove the cake from the oven and set aside.




Syrup
Right towards the end of the cake’s cooking time, combine the syrup ingredients in a small saucepan and bring just to simmer, cooking until the sugar has dissolved. Spike the top of the still warm cake then spoon over the lemon and sugar mixture. Leave to cool completely before icing.



Icing
In a small bowl combine all the ingredients to make a smooth thick icing. Top the cake with the icing allowing it to drip down the sides. Allow to set a little before topping with a few strands of candied lemon rind.



I took the cake into work for morning tea and it was declared 'delicious' and it was. It's a nice moist simple cake, gently perfumed with lemon and elderflower, one I'll definitely be making again.

See you all again next week. 

Bye for now,

Jillian

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